Archive for May, 2011

May 25 2011

DAC and IPV6- a big June ahead

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The EDA and design community usually looks forward to the first day of DAC (Design Automation Conference) with excitement.  Not only is it Free Exhibits Monday, but the directions for tools and issues that are being address by the EDA community with products and partners are usually announced.  These announcements focus on the capabilities of the advanced processes to actually have design support information available to designers other than those from the 2-3 joint development companies.   These announcements and the tools vendors also address the reality of which process nodes the designs are being built.  This is the usual buzz in the industry, and this year takes place on Monday June 6th.
The buzz may not be long lived as there is another big happening on Wed 6/8, which will actually have more impact on designers that promised release of tools that aren’t quite ready and IP that is not quite frozen.  The official internet launch and support of a test run for IPV6 which happens on Wednesday 6/8. World IPV6 Day (http://isoc.org/wp/worldipv6day/) is a 24hour test run of websites, network hardware, operating systems, and ISPs to see if the new addressing scheme works.  The necessity of IPV6 is becauser we are running out of IP addresses for devices and web destinations under the IPV4 system.
This change ripples through all levels of the design hierarchy, and the larger address size will end up impacting throughput, performance, memory cycling, effective response time and connectivity handshake for any wired or wireless device that needs to have network connectivity.  The change effects products in production and in early phase design, because the IPV4 compatibility is not permanent, and has to be upgraded to the new IPV6 stadards for long terms use.   Details on the switch and the new specifications can be found at The Internet Engineering Task Force web site http://www.ietf.org/   The spec itself can be found at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2460.txt .  The fundamental changes is IPv6 increases the IP address size from 32 bits to 128 bits.  There are a number of other details, but that shift is the major one which will effect embedded and custom designs.
These two events, are going to make for an interesting June.
PC

The EDA and design community usually looks forward to the first day of DAC (Design Automation Conference) with excitement.  Not only is it Free Exhibits Monday, but the directions for tools and issues that are being address by the EDA community with products and partners are usually announced.  These announcements focus on the capabilities of the advanced processes to actually have design support information available to designers other than those from the 2-3 joint development companies.   These announcements and the tools vendors also address the reality of which process nodes the designs are being built.  This is the usual buzz in the industry, and this year takes place on Monday June 6th.

The buzz may not be long lived as there is another big happening on Wed 6/8, which will actually have more impact on designers that promised release of tools that aren’t quite ready and IP that is not quite frozen.  The official internet launch and support of a test run for IPV6 which happens on Wednesday 6/8.   World IPV6 Day is a 24hour test run of websites, network hardware, operating systems, and ISPs to see if the new addressing scheme works.  The necessity of IPV6 is becauser we are running out of IP addresses for devices and web destinations under the IPV4 system.

This change ripples through all levels of the design hierarchy, and the larger address size will end up impacting throughput, performance, memory cycling, effective response time and connectivity handshake for any wired or wireless device that needs to have network connectivity.  The change effects products in production and in early phase design, because the IPV4 compatibility is not permanent, and has to be upgraded to the new IPV6 stadards for long terms use.   Details on the switch and the new specifications can be found at The Internet Engineering Task Force web site,  the spec itself can be found at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2460.txt .  The fundamental changes is IPv6 increases the IP address size from 32 bits to 128 bits.  There are a number of other details, but that shift is the major one which will effect embedded and custom designs.

These two events, are going to make for an interesting June.

PC

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