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General Chair Shares Insights on DVCon 2016

Chair Yatin Trivedi highlights the upcoming US chip design-verification show and differences with European and Asian DVCon events.

By John Blyler, Editorial Director

What’s new at this year’s annual semiconductor chip design and verification conference (DVCon), held between Feb. 29 through Mar. 3, 2016, at the Doubletree Hotel in San Jose, CA? How has the globalization of this event affected the primary show? “JB Systems” sat down with Yatin Trivedi, DVCon General Chair, to answer these questions. What follows is a portion of that interview. – JB

Blyler: How is DVCon doing?

Trivedi: For 2016, we expect attendance to be around 1,000 attendees, about 800 attendees and about 300 exhibitors, which will be greater than last year. The number of exhibit booths should be about 40. People are still signing up. As usual, there will be lots of networking events with qualified engineers. I like to think of DVCon as “Facebook” live for engineers. The value of the show remains the same: attendees are able to learn from their peers.

There will be two panel sessions: one moderated by Jim Hogan on where the industry goes from here and the other moderated by Brain Bailey on ESL. Other opportunities exist in the poster sessions, where people talk with the authors and other engineers. Everyone exchanges good pieces of information about what does and doesn’t work and under what conditions.

The exhibit floor provides a place to show attendees that vendor claims about solutions can actually be demonstrated.

There will be 37 papers at this year’s show plus a couple of invited talks. The CEO of Mentor Graphics, Wally Rhines, will present the invited keynote on Tuesday. Tutorials start on Monday with courses on Accellera standards given by Accellera committee members. Vendors will provide tutorials on Thursday to solve specific problems. Topics range from debug methodologies to the Universal Verification Methodology (UVM), SystemC, formal verification and more.

Blyler: Recently, DVCon has expanded into Europe and Asia. What is the latest information on those activities?

Trivedi: DVCon US is the flagship of the show. A few years back we had the first DVCon Europe and India. We started events in these countries as a way to serve specific centers of excellence. For example, a lot of automotive work is done in Europe because of the presence of BMW, Mercedes and other automotive manufactures. Naturally, a large community of electronic designers has developed to support these companies.

Another motivating factor is that not everybody has the opportunity to travel to the US for DVCon. European Accellera board members like ST, NXP, Infineon, ARM and others convinced us of the need for a DVCon in Europe. So we put together the first conference in 2014, which had about 200 people. At last year’s event in 2015, we had over 300 attendees. The reason for the growth was pent-up interest from local communities that could not travel. The other benefit of a local DVCon was that people who could attend would be more willing to submit technical papers.

Blyler: Did the show in India grow from the same motivation as in Europe?

Trivedi: No, it happened a little bit differently. In India, there was already an event called India SystemC User Group or ISCUG. This event had about 300 people. At the same time, there existed a chip design-verification (DV) community that wasn’t exactly served by ISCUG. The merging of the Open SystemC Initiative (OSCI) with Accellera presented the opportunity for DVCon to open in India with two tracks: One for ESL or SystemC and another track on design and verification (DV). The later track provided a new platform where DV engineers could get together. At the first show in 2014, we had about 450 attendees. Last year in 2015, we topped 600 attendees. As a two year track record, that’s about 30 to 40% growth year-over-year.

Initially, we were worried that these new conferences might cannibalize the original US conference. That fear never came true because the paper submissions for the new shows came from local communities as did the volunteer organizations in terms of program and steering committees, exhibitors, etc. And the attendance came locally. It was probably something we should have done earlier.

This means that DVCON globally has grown to a 2000+ worldwide community.

Blyler: Thank you.

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